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how long does it take to tame a canary?


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#1 mondo

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 11:29 AM

my one month old canary have been living with me for a week (so she's now about 5 weeks old).
during that time i've tried hand taming her.
everyday i stuck my hand in her cage, holding her treat near her perch.
sometimes she'd gladly close in and is eager to eat
some other times she panics and flutters around, or just ignore the treat...

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its like she have mood swing or something!!!
do you other people experience this?
and what can i do to calm her down?

thx

#2 maryavnmom

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 04:18 PM

Depends on what you call tame. Most canaries are not tame. They are cage birds. If you can get them to eat from your hand then that is probably as tame as a canary gets. A canary will never interact with you like a parakeet. They are to be enjoyed for their beauty and song.

#3 Powder

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 12:08 AM

What are you hoping your canary will do? Sit on your finger maybe? I've heard that it's possible w/ lots of effort...but mostly they are for looking at and listening to...although you have a great start w/ it eating from your hand already! Looks like your cage is outside...don't let it escape because there's a really good chance you'll never be able to get him back.
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#4 mondo

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 02:38 AM

i just want her to feel safe around me...
so she can trust me and sit on my hand / shoulder, and comes when i call / offer treats...
that's all, i'm not expecting any tricks like parrots...

her cage may be outside but its in the backyard and completely safe...

#5 christie99

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 03:43 AM

Canaries and finches don't sit on hands and shoulders the way parrots do. The best you may get is sitting on your hand in the cage to eat, but loose in the house is dangerous for a tiny bird such as these.

#6 Powder

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 07:32 AM

I've seen pictures of canaries sitting on peoples fingers....I expect it took a lot of work (time and commitment) to make that happen. Food is a great incentive and they will definitely get to know and trust the person who feeds and cares for them no doubt and since you're starting w/ your bird at a very young age your perseverance may pay off. Be careful in the house because your bird may fly into a window and that can cause great harm. Any unexpected loud noise will startle even the best trained / tame bird....and once they are gone you have only a small chance they'll return to their cage when hungry.
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#7 christie99

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 09:06 PM

Many of the finches and canaries you see that are hand tame are the result of a breeder having to handfeed to save a clutch. If the bird is handfed by necessity from a young age and never around "wild/normal" birds of the same species it will remain tame. I do not reccomend handfeeding for a tame canary or finch though, it is VERY hard and many things can go wrong.

#8 mondo

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 02:00 AM

wow! today (11 / 2 / 11) is a good day!
she finally hop onto my hand! and after many times trying she's comfortable eating out of it :)
but i bet she's still not ready to hop without the bait (treat) :)

so how long should i wait for this ?

#9 Powder

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 06:16 PM

That's fantastic! Keep up the good work. (2/11/11) right? How much time do you spend w/ her each day? I would think the more time you give her, the more she'll reward you.
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#10 mondo

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 08:30 AM

That's fantastic! Keep up the good work. (2/11/11) right? How much time do you spend w/ her each day? I would think the more time you give her, the more she'll reward you.


during monday to saturday i spend time from 6.30 in the morning to 8.00 because they say that's when the bird is hungriest. after that i go to work.
5.00 to 5.30 i got home and spend a bit more time with her. and then she goes to sleep.
if its sunday or holiday, i could go the whole day. midday is for resting.

now i think i'll wait about a week until i try without treat, and hopefully i can pet her. :)

#11 maryavnmom

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 07:34 PM

I am curious. When you say her cage is outside in backyard what do you mean? I can guarantee you the first time she escapes from cage you will never see her again.

#12 mondo

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 12:56 AM

i meant the cage is not indoors, its outdoors, in the terrace.
why? are you worried about snow? i'm in the tropics
cats? its in the backyard so cats don't enter
its safe i garantee you...
and besides, i'm not clumsy, i'm careful

#13 maryavnmom

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 04:56 AM

Is this an enclosed area where an escaped bird could not take off to freedom. Indoors an escaped bird is in a room in a house. Even then a full flighted bird is difficult to catch. I know how fast a canary can escape but at least indoors there are not predators waiting for a meal. I hope this bird is inside a cage inside a screened area. Usually an outdoor aviary has double doors.

#14 mondo

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 08:01 AM

Is this an enclosed area where an escaped bird could not take off to freedom. Indoors an escaped bird is in a room in a house. Even then a full flighted bird is difficult to catch. I know how fast a canary can escape but at least indoors there are not predators waiting for a meal. I hope this bird is inside a cage inside a screened area. Usually an outdoor aviary has double doors.


dude seriously... you're so OUT OF TOPIC!
not to be mean or anything but its seriously annoying! what are you? an inspector?

#15 christie99

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 06:48 PM

Relax, those of us that have been around a long time have seen time and time again people who are being careful loose their bird outside. They are trying to understand and make sure you understand the risk of having your hand in the cage (which makes it open) outside in a place where you cannot recover your bird. There is a risk.

Personally, I'm curious how you are sure that cats cannot come in the area and how you keep the bird safe from crows, ravens and hawks. In my expierence, a cage is like a tent when camping, a false sense of security.

#16 mondo

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 01:03 PM

Relax, those of us that have been around a long time have seen time and time again people who are being careful loose their bird outside. They are trying to understand and make sure you understand the risk of having your hand in the cage (which makes it open) outside in a place where you cannot recover your bird. There is a risk.

Personally, I'm curious how you are sure that cats cannot come in the area and how you keep the bird safe from crows, ravens and hawks. In my expierence, a cage is like a tent when camping, a false sense of security.


yea, i guess i got quite tense... i asked about taming and people answered about something else...

yes i'm sure! i mean, i've lived about 19 years and no cats has ever came

i understand that you people (in USA especially) kept your birds indoors.
but not me, i live in indonesia, here people kept their birds outdoor in the terrace.
and there's NO problem about cats or other predators...

#17 maryavnmom

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 05:58 PM

Does everyone in Indonesia tame canaries? If so, What do you mean by tame? If you mean accept food from your hand and perch on your finger while in the confines of its cage that can be done. If you mean return to you outside the cage not going to happen. Every time the cage door is open there is a risk. Most canary cages are designed so food and water can be changed without opening door for that reason.

#18 christie99

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 07:12 PM

Thank you for taking my post seriously. The main reason most people in the US don't keep their birds outside is because of the danger from predators, theft, and the cold exposure in winter. There are just a few states that have warm enough weather to do so, and even then, there are times when the weather is cold enough to kill birds.

The main reason people aren't answering about taming a canary is because nobody knows. I've seen a handful of tame finches and canaries, but these were all a product of handfeeding.

#19 mondo

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 10:45 AM

Does everyone in Indonesia tame canaries? If so, What do you mean by tame? If you mean accept food from your hand and perch on your finger while in the confines of its cage that can be done. If you mean return to you outside the cage not going to happen. Every time the cage door is open there is a risk. Most canary cages are designed so food and water can be changed without opening door for that reason.


actually NO, most (i'm not saying all) Indonesian people usually see canaries as sing and watch only bird and can never ever come out of the cage.
and it is because of that is why i want to show to people that you can have them tame! i mean i've seen lots of videos on youtube and that motivates me!

lol dude :D
here people just use "one door cage", not those fancy multi door cages :P and yet its been done in many generations ^_^
luckily (and i hope this reason calms you down) is that the one door is not that big...

#20 mondo

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 10:50 AM

Thank you for taking my post seriously. The main reason most people in the US don't keep their birds outside is because of the danger from predators, theft, and the cold exposure in winter. There are just a few states that have warm enough weather to do so, and even then, there are times when the weather is cold enough to kill birds.

The main reason people aren't answering about taming a canary is because nobody knows. I've seen a handful of tame finches and canaries, but these were all a product of handfeeding.


um you're welcome? :)
i don't wanna talk too much. but i'll show you my progress:
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